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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
, a former baghdad chief for "the new york times." also with us tonight, laura lippman, with her new novel "i'd know you anywhere." john burns and author laura lippman. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis smiley in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] >> ending this war is not in the interest of iraq. it is in our own. the united states has paid a huge price to put the future of iraq in the hands of its people. we have said our young men and women to make enormous sacrifices in iraq -- we have sent them. we have persevered because of a belief we share with the iraqi people, a belief that out of war, a new beg
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a little tension between the two of you. >> no tensio
is an example of what we are up against. >> benjamin netanyahu thanked the u.s. president for his efforts and described the talks says "open and productive." >> id president's statement is an expression of our -- i think the president's statement is an expression of our determination to fight and you have talks that are open, productive, and serious in the quest for peace, also centered around the need for security arrangements that are able to roll back this kind of terror and threats to security. and that is a fundamental element, an important foundation of the peace we seek, and i appreciate, mr. president, your efforts to advance this beast -- peace for us and our neighbors and, i think we can say, the world. >> mr. obama also welcomed the leaders of the palestinian and the israelis. king abdullah and other leaders will join the talks. but is there it now and new commitment to achieve peace? our correspondent reports from the west bank on what are the unresolved tensions. >> on a hill overlooking the city of jerusalem, hundreds of jewish settlers came to bury the dead. the symmetry is
this chance for peace. as the u.s. combat mission in iraq comes to an end, the american vice-president says baghdad is close to a new government. no regrets from tony blair about his decision to send british troops to invade iraq. very warm welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers in the states on pbs and also around the globe, with me, peter dobbie. coming up later for you -- how your name and postcode can affect your chances of getting a job in france. and new pictures of the world's most famous ship wreck -- the titanic in 3-d. the u.s. president barack obama has urged israelis and palestinians not to let slip an opportunity for peace that he says may not soon return. he made the remark as he opened a landmark peace talks. our middle east editor jeremy bowen reports from washington. >> if it feels as though they have all been this way before. an american president, and israeli prime minister, launching a new attempt at middle east peace in fact -- -- these at the white house and condemning bloodshed. >> there are going to be those who do everything they can to undermine the
jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions a
gathered to denounce reports that copies of the koran was burned in the u.s. in delhi, the u.s. condemned the violence and anyone in america who insulted the koran. >> i strongly condemn that such acts as disrespectful and unrepresentative of american values. the deliberate destruction of any holy book is a horrible act. >> but kashmir is an indian challenge. the prime minister with military commanders is deeply distressed by the latest violence. but this government seems powerless to stop it. kashmir has been divided between india and pakistan for more than six decades. it remains a dangerous tension in south asia and a rallying cry for asian militants. mylan unrest has implications for stability and india and pakistan and further appeals in afghanistan. >> the man behind the controversial plans for muslim community center near ground zero has said extremists of any faith must not be allowed to hijack this course. the imam says it's vital to have a platform where the voice of moderate muslims can be amplified. many americans are opposed to the center. >> in recent weeks the imam has trie
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
%. give us the lowest corporation tax in the g-7. and that is a huge advert in this program, by the way, it is a good low corporate tax environment. >> rose: that's what ireland did exactly. >> and i think now they were able to take it quite a lot further than 24%. but nevertheless, from we're taking it from 28% to 24%. if you think of many people in my situation, many people sitting in a room like this, in faced with a very high budget deficit we would be very tempted to put up business taxes. but because, precisely because i want to give-- given growth and private sector investment and job creation, that i'm actually going in the other direction and reducing business taxes. >> rose: but the president is making in the united states the exact opposite decision. >> every country has got to make his own decisions. and the american administration has got challenges just like the british government has got. challenges. but actually, if you look at, from what i can gather, the u.s. administration is concerned about infrastructure. we've concerned about infrastructure. we're protecting the ca
. and now the government tolerates night markets, where people can sell in the streets. police used to stop this kind of thing. now they let it happen. >> it signals there will be a very stable transition. and in north korea. it will take longer than one or three years. >> there is one other important player behind the scenes today, and that is china. china may be worried that north korea will inflow of with incalculable consequences for the in -- will in flowed with incalculable consequences for the entire region so, it is that closed mysterious country across the river -- it could mean that changes on the way for the family business. >> john since then, our world affairs editor there. at least seven people are confirmed killed. the rain collapsed a hillside, burying people in their homes as they slept. rescue workers have been struggling to reach the scene. 30 died in a mudslide in colombia. emergency services say the scale of the slide has made it rescue difficult across the country. 74 died in recent heavy rains. an egyptian court has reduced the sentence on a billionaire accused of kil
and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conver
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)